#Plant17 May Be A Soggy Situation

May 23, 2017

Conditions have been wet and cool across many midwest states this planting season. What does this mean for your planted soybean fields?

Damping Off
Soybean stand loss early in the season is often due to “damping off” which is a broad term which refers to seed and seedling diseases. The four big ones are pythium, phytophthora, fusarium and rhizoctonia. Pythophthora and pythium are often the two most common and troubling for us in our market area. These two pathogens are sometimes also referred to in slang as “water molds” as they thrive in saturated soils with free water. They have spores that can survive in soil and crop residue for long periods of time and when soils become saturated with free water spores can detect plant root exudates. They then literally swim to the root and infect. Quite simply, without wet soils they are not able to readily infect, so in drier years they are typically not an issue. 

Pythium
Stand loss early in the season with early-to-normal planting dates is more typically associated with pythium because it thrives in cold wet soils; while phytophthora infects more readily in somewhat warmer wet soils. With the recent cooler weather, pythium may be the leading candidate as the pathogen causing any stand loss/damping off within fields but an actual lab diagnosis can often be the only way to 100% confirm the pathogen in question as all four of the major soybean damping off diseases can be hard to distinguish from one another with the naked eye and their infection environments can overlap each other.

Genetic Resistance
Many soybean varieties offer native genetic resistance to specific races of phytophthora which is very valuable. However, there are many different races of phytophthora present even within the same field, so one specific phytophthora gene may not always be effective. Partial resistance or “field tolerance” is also a rating which you will see in most product guides which is just as important. The fungicidal components of virtually all complete soybean seed treatment packages also offers a level of protection against the damping off pathogens. However, that protection can simply be overwhelmed under high pressure saturated soil conditions and begins to slowly fade following the first few weeks after planting.

Use of Pre-Emerge Herbicides
Soybean seedlings may also be further stressed when PPO soybean pre-emerge herbicides containing flumioxazin, sulfentrazone, or saflufenacil have been used in conjunction with cool and wet soil conditions. Soybean pre-emerge herbicides containing these actives are quite common in the industry and used on lots of soybean acres as they are generally good at controlling problematic small seeded broadleaves such as marestail and waterhemp. These herbicides can cause some stunting of seedlings most often due to some minor to moderate burning of the cotyledons and hypocotyl as the seedling emerges through the soil/herbicide layer. Cool wet conditions make it harder for the young seedling to metabolize the chemical.

It is quite possible that any fields currently showing damping off symptoms may have more than one thing going on. Variety, pathogen and herbicide may all play a part.

Contact your local Hoegemeyer DSM or Agronomist for more information.


Categories: Planting, Soils, Soybeans     Comments: 0    

Corn Planting and the Potential for Chilling Injury

April 28, 2017

The Midwest has experienced some stretches of below-normal temperatures, with cold, rainy conditions this spring. Research shows that the opportune time to plant corn is somewhere between the last two weeks of April and the first few days of May. However, Mother Nature isn’t necessarily on that same schedule. Fields that have been recently planted or those that will be planted in the next couple days may be subject to seedling injury.

SIGNS OF INJURY

Corn that has been recently planted in the Midwest has experienced less-than-ideal overall conditions, especially when it comes to temperature. In many locations, the weather pattern of cold rain and low temperatures has potential to promote a problem for young seedlings called “Imbibitional Chilling Injury.” Some basic visual symptoms may be corkscrewing of the young germinating plant or leafing out below ground level. Consider digging up a few seedlings and checking them for signs of corkscrewing, leafing out underground or damping off.

WHY WOULD SEEDLINGS REACT LIKE THIS?

A possible issue that cause less than optimum stands and poor emergence is chilling injury to the mesocotyl or coleoptile plant tissue caused by sub-lethal cold temperatures (less than 50 degrees) during the period very soon after planting when seeds begin to imbibe water. The seed will not begin to germinate until the soil temp approaches 50 degrees, however, the seed will allow water to enter regardless of temperature. This chilling injury basically equates to cells rupturing which results in the corkscrewing of the mesocotyl. This delays the emergence of the coleoptile prior to the usual emergence of leaves from the coleoptile.

In addition to slowing the germination process, cold temperatures, snow and cold rains may cause irreparable harm to the delicate structures of an emerging corn seedling. When dry corn seed absorbs cold water, Imbibitional Chilling Injury is not uncommon. Such injury in corn seeds ruptures cell membranes and results in aborted radicles, proliferation of seminal roots, delayed seedling growth and potential for diseases pathogens to attack the young seedling. When temperatures remain at or below 50 degrees Fahrenheit after planting or fall below 50 degrees within 24-48 after planting, damage to germinating seed can be particularly severe as they imbibe water. This should be considered as there is risk associated with the temperature and moisture roller coaster we have experienced so far this planting season.

If you have any questions, contact your local Hoegemeyer agronomist or District Sales Manager.


Categories: Corn, Frost Injury, Management     Comments: 0     Tags: 2017 Planting, chilling injury    

The right seed at the right planting population

March 15, 2017
Author Jeremy Horvatich

Increase the performance and profitability potential for your fields with these Hoegemeyer planting population recommendations. Our recommendations are powered by years of local testing data.

The testing – multiple testing variables for a better understanding of product performance

Hoegemeyer continues our extensive work on corn population studies. We test our current line-up along with new experimental hybrids coming down the pipeline. At each location, we plant four rows, 20 ft plots at five populations (18k, 26K, 34K, 42K, 50K) and we replicate this process three times. We will take stand counts and harvest the middle two rows come harvest time. This provides us information to help understand how these hybrids perform at different yield environments.

Each location will then be categorized into one of four different Yield Environments:

  • Very High equals  >240 Bu/A
  • High equals 180-240 Bu/A
  • Medium equals 120-180 Bu/A
  • Low equals <120 Bu/A

The results – ideal plant population recommendations for your unique acres

As a result, we create these population charts for each hybrid in our line-up to help educate farmers about the ideal population for their yield environment. Use these recommendations and work with your local Hoegemeyer dealer to maximize the potential of your seed.‚Äč 

The team – in-house agronomy research to provide local solutions

At Hoegemeyer, we are proud of the in-house agronomy research that we provide to farmers to help educate their farming decisions. It’s just one more step in offering top-quality products coupled with expert advice that provide you that Western Corn Belt Performance you deserve on your acres.


Categories: Corn, Planting, Population     Comments: 0    

High soil pH a concern?

February 21, 2017
Author Craig Langemeier

A great harvest starts in the SPRING when planting the right seed on your unique acres. Growers often reference corn suitability ratings to provide valuable insight to a hybrid’s strengths and weaknesses, and how that translates into productivity and profitability for their acres.

Know your soil profile

When it comes down to seed selection, growers should take into account the soil profile in each field. High soil pH is a common challenge in the Western Corn Belt. Decreasing soil pH through management practices is very difficult and typically not economical, so what should a producer do? “Plant a hybrid with good tolerance to high soil pH, a suitability score of 5 or higher,” states Craig Langemeier, Hoegemeyer sales agronomist.

The effects of high pH soils

Hoegemeyer is committed to providing growers products that can tolerate these stressful pH conditions. High pH soils cause a symptom known as Iron Deficiency Chlorosis (IDC). Several nutrients become harder for the plant to extract from the soil at a pH above 7.5 including phosphorus, zinc, iron and manganese. This may cause stunting, yellowing, interveinal chlorosis and even plant death in some hybrids.

Commitment to research

Hoegemeyer conducts extensive research on all products before they are brought to market. Research efforts have recently ramped up to provide high-performing pH tolerant products growers demand. During the 2016 growing season, replicated trials were conducted with over 70 entries at two high pH environment locations. This research aids in providing the right seed to perform in your soil type.

Selecting the right seed

Do you have high soil pH? Do you have the right seed to perform these acres? Different genetics are going to perform differently on each soil type, be confident you’re selecting the right seed for your farms – talk to your local Hoegemeyer dealer for placement recommendations.  Check out the Hoegemeyer brand hybrids that are recommended for high soil pH here.


Categories: Corn, High pH Soil, Soils     Comments: 0    

Plot Testing For The Right Seed

December 12, 2016
Author Craig Langemeier

Your harvest success starts with the right seed. Selecting the right seed for your soil type, growing environment and field variability are crucial considerations each year. Hoegemeyer uses a large network of on-farm test plots to evaluate our products to help growers ensure they are placing the right hybird on each acre. Our test plot protocol evaluates:

This information gathered allows us to help farmers select THE RIGHT SEED for each unique growing condition. Contact your Hoegemeyer sales representative to learn more about why Hoegemeyer Hybrids make the right seed for your farm in 2017.

I recently shared insights from the Hoegemeyer Hybrid test plots with Shalee Peters from KRVN. Listen here for more info.


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